2023

MASSACHUSETTS CLEAN ENERGY INDUSTRY REPORT

2023

MASSACHUSETTS CLEAN ENERGY INDUSTRY REPORT

CONTENTS

About MassCEC

Note From The CEO

Industry Highlights

Economic Contribution

Massachusetts Is A Leader

Massachusetts Climate Goals

Clean Energy Jobs and Businesses

Gross State Product

Clean Energy Talent

Workforce Needs Assessment

Clean Energy Investments and Innovation

Regional Analysis

Methodology

Glossary

ABOUT MASSCEC

SINCE 2010 MASSCEC HAS

Awarded $654M in programs and investments and attracted $2.6B+ in private and federal capital
Awarded 47,000+ projects, supporting 164MW+ of solar and 251MW+ of clean heating and cooling
Supported 5,800+ college and vocational internships with 620+ employers, attracting 65% women and minority interns
Tested 55 wind turbine blades at the Wind Technology Testing Center, generating over $25M+ in revenue
Awarded $170M for technology innovation and company growth
Developed the 1st purpose-built port in the U.S. for staging and deployment of offshore wind projects

ABOUT MASSCEC

The Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) is a state economic development agency dedicated to accelerating the growth of the clean energy sector across the Commonwealth while helping to meet clean energy, climate, and economic development goals. MassCEC works to spur job creation, deliver statewide environmental benefits, and secure long-term economic growth for the people of Massachusetts.

MassCEC is governed by a Board of Directors, which is chaired by Massachusetts Energy and Environmental Affairs Secretary Rebecca Tepper.

AREAS OF FOCUS

MassCEC fosters collaboration amongst the climate industry, state government, research universities, community-based organizations, and the financial sector to advance the state’s clean energy economy. We partner with a diverse range of stakeholders, with a particular focus on clean transportation, high-performance buildings, net-zero grid, offshore wind, and clean energy workforce development.
Staging of offshore wind turbine components at MassCEC’s New Bedford Marine Commerce Terminal
NOTE FROM THE CEO
Photo of CEO Emily Reichert

Emily Reichert

The Massachusetts Clean Energy Center is pleased to present our 2023 Clean Energy Industry Report. This report provides an overview of the clean energy industry in Massachusetts, demonstrates the tangible results of focused leadership in both the public and private sectors, and shares stories of MassCEC’s successful contributions to growing the industry.

This past year, the clean energy field experienced a dynamic period of powerful activity. Since taking office in January, the Healey-Driscoll Administration has sent a clear signal that Massachusetts is ready to lead on climate. Supporting expansion for equity-led workforce growth, pioneering creative climate financing solutions, bolstering budgetary support for energy and environmental activities, and striking a bold stance on offshore wind, Governor Healey and other leaders in state government are empowering Massachusetts to reach its climate targets.

It is clear there is a pressing need for a robust and well-trained clean energy workforce in Massachusetts. Presently, the state boasts 108,450 direct clean energy jobs, which further supports an additional 104,325 direct or induced jobs. In July, MassCEC unveiled an expansive Workforce Needs Assessment detailing the roadmap for clean energy workforce growth. To meet climate milestones, we must add 38,000 more workers to the industry by 2030. Building upon our robust workforce development programming, we can meet these challenges and bring valuable and rewarding careers to Massachusetts residents.

MASSACHUSETTS CLEAN ENERGY INDUSTRY HIGHLIGHTS

2023

MASSACHUSETTS CLEAN ENERGY INDUSTRY HIGHLIGHTS1

212,775 total direct, indirect, and induced jobs and $33.1 billion in total Gross State Product (GSP) supported by the clean energy industry
108,450 direct clean energy workers in MA
74% of clean energy jobs and businesses are located outside of Route 128
Clean energy jobs represent 2.8% of jobs in MA 
Clean Energy Companies represent more than $14 billion in GSP
71% of clean energy workers are employed in the Energy Efficiency, Demand Management, and Clean Heating and Cooling Sector
Industry GSP increased by $5.7 billion since 2012, a 63% increase that outpaced growth in MA overall GSP, which grew by 55% over the same time
MA has 4% of all clean energy jobs in the U.S., while being home to only 2% of the country’s population
58% of all clean energy firms are small businesses  (10 or fewer workers)
The clean energy jobs created by 2030 will have a median hourly wage of $36.58 (based on today’s dollars)
1 Unless otherwise noted, the numbers represented in the 2023 Massachusetts Clean Energy Industry Highlights are as of December 2022.
0
clean energy businesses

Since 2010, the Massachusetts clean energy industry has experienced:

0
job growth
adding
0
new workers
While COVID-19 led to a loss of 12,800 jobs by December 2020, the industry has begun to rebound, with over 7,200 jobs gained as of December 2022.

Sub-sectors that experienced the greatest rate of job growth between 2022 and 2023 reports 2

Electric Vehicles
39% 
(+1,227 jobs)
Advanced & Recycled
Building Materials
3.5% 
(+651 jobs)
Solar
3.2% 
(+506 jobs)
2 The 2023 Report shows sub-sector jobs growth in absolute numbers versus prior reports, which have shown percentage job growth.
ECONOMIC CONTRIBUTION ANALYSIS

ECONOMIC CONTRIBUTION ANALYSIS

DECEMBER 2022 

For the purpose of this report, only those workers who are directly supporting clean energy activities, such as conducting research, manufacturing products, performing installations, or repairing and maintaining clean energy systems, are included as clean energy workers. However, the impact of the industry is significantly greater than these “direct” jobs alone.3
The clean energy industry has a similar number of direct jobs as the College & University or Restaurant industries yet exceeds both industries’ economic contribution in indirect and induced jobs and state GSP.
3 The economic contribution analysis in this report was calculated using IMPLAN modeling software. The study area was set as the State of Massachusetts, and the event year was set to 2021 since 2022 IMPLAN data was not yet available.

Based on this analysis, the 

MASSACHUSETTS CLEAN ENERGY INDUSTRY 

is responsible for a total economic contribution of: 

212,775
combined direct, indirect, and induced jobs
$33.1
BILLION
in MA GSP
$2.6
BILLION
in state and local taxes
$4.4
BILLION
in federal taxes
The
108,450
DIRECT CLEAN ENERGY JOBS
in Massachusetts supported an additional:
38,466
INDIRECT JOBS
(those outside of the clean energy sector that provide critical supply chain goods and services)
65,859
INDUCED JOBS 
(those that result from increased spending in the economy)
MASSACHUSETTS IS A LEADER

MASSACHUSETTS IS A LEADER

#1
Highest clean energy median wage in the U.S. at $29.84, which is 23% above the MA statewide median wage by Environmental Entrepreneurs (2020) 
#1
and #3
For utility-specific energy efficiency work by Eversource Massachusetts and National Grid Massachusetts respectively by the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (2023)
#1
On the clean energy Community Power Scorecard for the 7th straight year by the Institute for Local Self-Reliance (2023) 
#1
Top states for LEED-certified green building by the U.S. Green Building Council (2022) 

In the Top Ranking

For energy efficiency in the U.S. for the 2nd year in a row by the American Council for an Energy- Efficient Economy (2022) 
For clean energy jobs as a percentage of total employment by the U.S. Department of Energy (2023)
For clean energy storage jobs per capita by the U.S. Department of Energy 
MASSACHUSETTS IS A LEADER
MASSCEC SPOTLIGHT

MassCEC’s Offshore Wind Leadership

MassCEC began supporting the development of the offshore wind industry over a decade ago, knowing its potential to help meet the Commonwealth’s climate, energy, and economic development goals in Massachusetts. MassCEC has helped to reduce risk, increase market confidence, and support the economic development and workforce opportunities of the offshore wind industry.

MassCEC’s work has helped to address numerous challenges to growing the offshore wind industry, including: 

Developing the first purpose-built port in the U.S. 
Constructing the only commercial-scale wind blade testing facility in North America
Growing the pipeline of offshore wind workers and cultivating the supply chain in Massachusetts 
The Commonwealth has conducted 3 offshore wind procurements to date totaling 3,200 MW of capacity, with the 4th procurement underway for up to 5,600 MW. The Vineyard Wind project, the first offshore wind project in the pipeline, is slated to be fully operational in 2024. 
Staging of offshore wind turbine components at MassCEC’s New Bedford Marine Commerce Terminal
Staging of offshore wind turbine components at MassCEC’s New Bedford Marine Commerce Terminal

MassCEC’s Offshore Wind Ports Challenge 

Successful establishment of the offshore wind industry in Massachusetts will require the build-out of multiple highly specialized port facilities for deployment, manufacturing, and operations.

MassCEC leveraged significant private and other public investments in specific maritime port rehabilitation and redevelopment activities to advance the offshore wind sector and capture high-value supply chain and workforce opportunities for the Commonwealth.

Broader Impacts

Significantly increases the regional capacity for offshore wind manufacturing, deployment, and operations & maintenance while increasing local employment and economic impact.

Initial Results 

$180M investment
$444M leveraged funds
7 Port Projects in 3 environmental justice communities
MASSACHUSETTS’ CLIMATE GOALS

Massachusetts’ Climate Goals 

In 2017, Massachusetts enacted the Clean Energy Standard, which aims to fully decarbonize the state’s electricity generation by 2050. Additionally, in 2021 and 2022, Massachusetts enacted comprehensive climate legislation to target reaching net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 and supporting underserved populations. 
The Commonwealth has made progress in decarbonizing the electric grid, buildings, and vehicles, but more needs to be done to ensure the state meets its ambitious and critical goals.
MassCEC is poised to help tackle the most difficult challenges to achieving this climate goal, including testing and demonstrating new technologies and business models, supporting budding clean energy startups, supporting complex supply chains, engaging and informing consumers, and training a diverse and equitable workforce. 
CUMULATIVE HEAT PUMPS INSTALLED (WITH INCENTIVES)4
CUMULATIVE BATTERY AND PLUG‑IN HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLES4
4 Based on EEA’s Clean Energy Climate Plan Implementation Tracker (https://www.mass.gov/info-details/massachusetts-clean-energy-and-climate-metrics). Data updated as of July 2023.
MASSACHUSETTS GROSS EMISSIONS, 2050 CLEAN ENERGY CLIMATE PLAN
CLEAN ENERGY JOBS AND BUSINESSES

TOTAL CLEAN ENERGY JOBS5

Between 2010 and 2022, the clean energy industry in Massachusetts added a net 48,176 jobs, which accounts for 10% of all net jobs created in the state during that same time. Though the COVID-19 pandemic continues to have a lasting impact on the Massachusetts’ clean energy industry and the broader labor market, between the 2022 and 2023 reports, clean energy businesses added 4,160 jobs, representing a 4% increase. This is comparable to the growth of the Massachusetts wholesale trade and education industries, which also grew by 4% over the same time. The overall Massachusetts economy experienced job growth of 3% over the same time period.  

This report defines a clean energy worker as a person who spends some portion of their time working in renewable energy, energy efficiency, alternative transportation, or other carbon management technologies. In Massachusetts, 108,450 workers spend some portion of their time working in clean energy. Of those workers, 70% spend the “majority” or “all of their time” working in clean energy, compared to an average of 63% nationally. 
5For the purpose of this report, only those workers who are directly supporting clean energy activities, such as conducting research, manufacturing products, performing installations, or repairing and maintaining clean energy systems, are included as clean energy workers. However, the impact of the industry is significantly greater than these “direct” jobs alone. 
6Employer hiring estimates are based on current opinions regarding companies’ short-term growth. Respondents consider a variety of factors, including current policy, economic conditions, and labor availability. It is more of a measure of optimism or pessimism than a detailed projection.
0
growth since 2010
Clean energy employers are optimistic, estimating to hire roughly 5,900 additional employees in 2024. While actuals may vary from these estimates, it demonstrates the interest by clean energy companies to grow and expand their workforce to meet industry and consumer demand.6 
TOTAL CLEAN ENERGY JOBS
REPORT YEARS 2010-20237
72023 job numbers represented in this report are based on the 2023 USEER data collection effort and represent the net change in employment between December 2021 and December 2022.

CLEAN ENERGY JOBS BY VALUE CHAIN8

All value chain segments continued to grow, adding jobs between the 2022 and 2023 reports. Businesses with a primary focus on Sales & Distribution experienced the greatest growth, adding 1,276 workers (5% growth).  Installation grew by 4% (1,005 workers), while the Professional Services sector grew by 7% (598 workers). Additionally, businesses with a primary focus on Engineering & Research saw a growth rate of 3%, adding 559 new workers. 
8Definitions for all clean energy value chains, sectors, and sub-sectors can be found in the Glossary of this report.
PERCENT OF 2023 CLEAN ENERGY
JOBS BY VALUE CHAIN9
92023 job numbers represented in this report are based on the 2023 USEER data collection effort and represent the net change in employment between December 2021 and December 2022.

CLEAN ENERGY JOBS BY SECTOR8

Alternative Transportation saw the greatest growth rate at 39%, adding 1,279 jobs. Significant growth in the Alternative Transportation sector is attributable to the growing number of electric vehicle jobs. The growing number of electric vehicle jobs is driving significant growth in the Alternative Transportation sector, which has seen significant growth in Massachusetts and nationally over the last several years.

The Renewable Energy sector grew by 3% and the Energy Efficiency, Demand Management, and Clean Heating and Cooling sector, which continues to have the largest number of absolute jobs, grew by 3%.
TOTAL 2023 CLEAN ENERGY
JOBS BY SECTOR9
PERCENT OF 2023 CLEAN ENERGY
JOBS BY SECTOR9
8Definitions for all clean energy value chains, sectors, and sub-sectors can be found in the Glossary of this report. 
92023 job numbers represented in this report are based on the 2023 USEER data collection effort and represent the net change in employment between December 2021 and December 2022.

ENERGY EFFICIENCY, DEMAND MANAGEMENT, AND CLEAN HEATING AND COOLING JOBS10

The Energy Efficiency, Demand Management, and Clean Heating and Cooling sector continues to make up the largest portion of clean energy jobs in Massachusetts. Within this sector, Advanced and Recycled Building Materials saw the most considerable increase between the 2022 and 2023 reports, at 651 jobs. Clean, High Efficiency, and ENERGY STAR Heating and Cooling, which includes jobs related to the installation of air source heat pumps, saw the second largest increase of 392 jobs. While this is a growing sub-sector in Massachusetts, the state is far short of having enough workers to install the number of heat pumps needed to reach the state’s 2030 Clean Energy and Climate Plan goal.
102023 job numbers represented in this report are from the 2023 USEER data collection and represent the net change in employment between December 2021 and December 2022.
CLEAN ENERGY JOBS AND BUSINESSES
MASSCEC SPOTLIGHT
MassCEC supported Cambridge-Finch multi-family affordable housing built to Passive House standards.
MassCEC supported Cambridge-Finch multi-family affordable housing built to Passive House standards.

DECARBONIZING MULTI-FAMILY BUILDINGS 

Passive House building standards provide a framework for the construction of exceptionally energy-efficient, resilient, healthy, and comfortable buildings. In 2019 there were few Passive House buildings in Massachusetts, as they were believed to be overly complicated and expensive to build compared to those constructed using standard building practices. As a result, MassCEC developed the Passive House Design Challenge to demonstrate that multi-family affordable housing could be built to Passive House standards at a low- to no-cost premium. This program educated the industry and informed additional state programs, resulting in a significant increase in the number of Passive House buildings in the state.

MassCEC’s Passive House Design Challenge 

Program Results

540 units (8 multi-family affordable projects)
86 developer & architect collaborations 
2.4% average cost premium for Passive House 
$1.8M awarded

Broader Impacts

De-risked concept of PH, leading to dramatic increase in Passive House design and construction: 
Informed Mass Save’s Passive House incentives, with 10,000+ units in the pipeline
Resulted in addition of Passive House incentives to tax credit program 
Informed Stretch Code to require Passive House for multi-family buildings  
CLEAN ENERGY JOBS AND BUSINESSES

ALTERNATIVE TRANSPORTATION JOBS11

Massachusetts’ Electric Vehicles workforce continues to grow, adding 1,227 jobs for a growth rate of 39%. The state experienced a higher rate of Electric Vehicle job growth relative to the U.S. as a whole, which increased by only 27% over the same time. The Commonwealth ranked 3rd for the highest growth rate and 6th for the total number of new Electric Vehicle jobs created in the United States. 
112023 job numbers represented in this report are based on the 2023 USEER data collection effort and represent the net change in employment between December 2021 and December 2022.
An all-electric shuttle bus providing free transportation from the Forest Hills Orange Line station to the Franklin Park Zoo.
CLEAN ENERGY JOBS AND BUSINESSES
MASSCEC SPOTLIGHT

ACCELERATING CLEAN TRANSPORTATION 

In Massachusetts, transportation currently produces more greenhouse gas emissions than any other sector. Residents of disadvantaged communities are more likely to be exposed to poor air quality from transportation-related emissions and often lack the resources to access cleaner transportation alternatives. 

MassCEC developed the Accelerating Clean Transportation for All (ACT4All) Program to pilot equity‑focused transportation programs and increase access for disadvantaged communities across Massachusetts. One program was focused on increasing e-bike use in pilots across the state. 

MassCEC’s ACT4ALL E-Bike Projects 

Cape Light Compact 

Outreach to low-income adults in 10 environmental justice communities
Distributing 405 point-of-sale e-bike incentives with co‑pay from participants 

MASSBIKE 

Distributing 203 e-bikes at no cost to low‑income Worcester participants 
Over 1,200 applicants have applied for e-bikes
Focusing on biker education and community events & rides

Metro Mobility 

Distributing 215 e-bikes in Greater Boston environmental justice communities & at affordable housing developments 


Pioneer Valley Planning Commission 

Distributing 135 e-bikes at no cost to participants 
Outreach focused in 3 Gateway cities & within environmental justice populations 
0
Miles Ridden 
(Around the world and more!)
0
of e-bike rides replace car trips 
0
Bikes Distributed 
0
Metric Tons of GHG Emissions Avoided 
CLEAN ENERGY JOBS AND BUSINESSES
Photo courtesy of Nth Cycle

RENEWABLE ENERGY JOBS12

Wind energy employment grew by 9% between the 2022 and 2023 reports, adding 211 new jobs. This is higher than the nationwide growth in wind jobs of 5% and slightly higher than New York’s wind energy job growth of 8%. Offshore wind-related jobs accounted for 10% of the Wind jobs. 

Massachusetts’ solar industry grew by 3% (506 jobs), which is just slightly lower than the nationwide growth in solar jobs of 4%
122023 job numbers represented in this report are based on the 2023 USEER data collection effort and represent the net change in employment between December 2021 and December 2022.

CLEAN ENERGY BUSINESSES 

The overall number of clean energy businesses13 in Massachusetts increased by 159 (or 2%) relative to the year before, with the largest addition of Renewable Energy businesses, at 63. The trend has remained the same, with the majority (54%) of businesses focused on Energy Efficiency, Demand Management, and Clean Heating and Cooling. 
Small businesses (1 to 10 employees) account for 58% of all clean energy businesses, which is similar to the 2022 report. Mid-size businesses (11 to 49 employees) represent 27% of clean energy businesses. 
0
clean energy businesses in 2023 
13For the purpose of this report, a business is an establishment location. A clean energy business or firm with multiple locations would be counted multiple times in this analysis based on the number of unique locations.
MassCEC supported Harbor Village multi-family housing, built to Passive House standards. Photo courtesy of Ken Carter, Sunbug Solar, a ReVision Energy Company.
GROSS STATE PRODUCT 

CLEAN ENERGY GROSS STATE PRODUCT14

The direct clean energy jobs in the industry contributed $14.9 billion, or roughly 2%, to the Commonwealth’s Gross State Product (GSP) in 2022. The industry’s GSP increased by 63% from 2012-2022. This outpaces overall growth in Massachusetts GSP, which grew by 55% over the same time period. Clean energy GSP increased by 3.7% (about $528 million) between 2021 and 2022. This rate of growth is slightly less than Retail Trade, which grew by 4.6% during the same time.
142022 data is the most recent available. The clean energy GSP was derived from survey incidence rates and proportional revenue reporting, together with existing data from the Bureau of Economic Analysis, calculated by NAICS code. Utility data and state government spending were included as direct inputs.

CLEAN ENERGY GROSS STATE PRODUCT BY VALUE CHAIN14

The contribution to the Massachusetts Clean Energy GSP by the Sales & Distribution sector grew by 10%, and Manufacturing grew by 7% between 2021 and 2022. 

The Manufacturing sector continues to account for the largest contribution to clean energy GSP, at 24%, or $3.6 billion
142022 data is the most recent available. The clean energy GSP was derived from survey incidence rates and proportional revenue reporting, together with existing data from the Bureau of Economic Analysis, calculated by the NAICS code. Utility data and state government spending were included as direct inputs.
WORKFORCE NEEDS ASSESSMENT
MASSCEC SPOTLIGHT

MASSACHUSETTS CLEAN ENERGY WORKFORCE NEEDS ASSESSMENT 

In July 2023, MassCEC released Powering the Future: A Massachusetts Clean Energy Workforce Needs Assessment. This report provides a comprehensive analysis of the clean energy workforce needed to meet the state’s ambitious 2030 decarbonization goals, coupled with strategies to expand and diversify the clean energy workforce.
CLEAN ENERGY EMPLOYMENT (2022 – 2030)15
15 Source: Powering the Future: A Massachusetts Clean Energy Workforce Needs Assessment, bit.ly/CleanEnergyWorkforce

Major findings of the report: 

0
additional clean energy workers are needed to meet the state’s 2030 decarbonization goals (37% growth) 
0
of employers report difficulty finding workers in this tight labor market 
0
of clean energy jobs created by 2030 will be middle- to high-wage jobs, with a median hourly wage of $36.58 (based on today’s dollar) 
0
of all new clean energy jobs will be in the Energy Efficiency, Demand Management, and Clean Heating and Cooling sector 
0
of new clean energy jobs are projected to be located outside of Route 128 

Top Five Report Highlights and Recommendations 

#1
Expanding clean energy career awareness is a crucial first step to growing and diversifying the pipeline for tomorrow’s climate-critical workers. 
#4
Workforce development strategies must be tailored to regional considerations, including local occupations most in demand, infrastructure needs, and obstacles to transition. 
#2
Scaling clean energy workforce training capacity will require leveraging existing systems and programs, prioritizing quality and effectiveness, and funding new or enhanced programs to address gaps and barriers.  
#5
While the report projects clean energy job growth across over 140 occupations, 65% of growth will be concentrated within 20 occupations. Some occupations will require considerable additional support to reduce the risk of a workforce bottleneck. At the same time, there will be opportunities for prospective workers of any interest to plug into the clean energy industry. 
#3
A just transition that provides economic opportunity and advancement to historically marginalized populations is critical to meeting the demand for clean energy workers. This includes supporting opportunities for fossil fuel workers to transition into comparable clean energy roles. 
CURRENT AND PROJECTED CLEAN ENERGY EMPLOYMENT BY OCCUPATIONAL ROLE16
16 These categories are based on U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) Occupational groups. Descriptions of each group and associated occupations can be found at https://www.bls.gov/soc/2018/major_groups.htm. Construction, Installation, Maintenance and Repair Occupations is the combination of “Construction Occupations” and “Installation, Maintenance and Repair Occupations.” These categories were combined due to the similarity in their skills and work tasks.
The report includes a gap analysis of ten high-growth occupations, a regional gap analysis, best practices for clean energy workforce development, and a companion Excel data workbook. 
The report found that while most clean energy workers surveyed faced some barriers to entry, female and non-white respondents were more likely to face barriers across multiple categories. 

There are many approaches that can reduce barriers to entry into the clean energy industry for prospective workers. Among them, expanding access to accurate, engaging, and comprehensive information about clean energy career pathways is essential to driving career awareness, especially for underrepresented populations in the industry. Future investments in training capacity should focus on expanding access to training opportunities and enhancing outreach and support services. Efforts to engage clean energy businesses to deploy inclusive hiring practices and a welcoming and supportive work environment can support increasing worker retention and diversity in the industry. 

Additionally, some persistent barriers, such as lack of reliable transportation, will require a whole government approach to effectively address. 

BARRIERS TO ENTRY INTO CLEAN ENERGY BY RACE AND ETHNICITY17

17Since respondents to this survey are workers who successfully entered the clean energy space, the results may contain a “survivorship bias.” The barriers and intensity of those barriers may differ for populations who are, or could be, interested in clean energy careers but have not enter the industry.
CLEAN ENERGY TALENT

CLEAN ENERGY TALENT IS NEEDED

As of December 2022, 89% of employers reported that it was “very difficult” or “somewhat difficult” to find qualified talent, an increase from 85% just prior to the pandemic. The percentage of employers reporting that it was very difficult to find qualified talent was 35% in December 2022. 

According to surveyed employers, approximately 71% of clean energy workers who were hired between December 2021 and December 2022 filled positions that required previous work experience. About 59% of these job hires filled newly created positions. The education credential requirements for the filled positions ranged, but almost half (49%) required a bachelor’s degree or higher. Alternatively, according to a recent MassCEC report, between now and 2030, clean energy employers will require a range of new workers across 140+ occupations, many of which will require less than a 4-year degree for entry.18
18 Source: “Powering the Future: A Massachusetts Clean Energy Workforce Needs Assessment,” Massachusetts Clean Energy Center, July 2023, bit.ly/CleanEnergyWorkforce

REASONS FOR HIRING CHALLENGES 

The most common reason cited by clean energy employers (45%) for reported hiring difficulty was competition with other industries for potential hires or a small applicant pool. Additionally, 33% of employers pointed to a lack of experience, training, or technical skills of applicants as a cause for their hiring challenges.
Employers reported that the occupations most difficult to hire were Engineers and Scientists, Management, Technicians and Mechanical Support, Electricians, and Construction workers. 
CAUSES FOR CLEAN ENERGY EMPLOYER HIRING DIFFICULTY REPORT YEAR 2023
CLEAN ENERGY TALENT
MASSCEC SPOTLIGHT

BUILDING THE CLEAN ENERGY WORKFORCE PIPELINE

To meet the Commonwealth’s 2030 decarbonization goals, the Massachusetts clean energy workforce will need to grow by an additional 38,000 more workers.19 To support the growth of a robust, diverse clean energy workforce needed to meet this demand, MassCEC’s Workforce Development programs:
19 MassCEC’s Massachusetts Clean Energy Workforce Needs Assessment: https://www.masscec.com/resources/massachusetts-clean-energy-workforce-needs-assessment
Increase awareness and effective skill preparation for critical clean energy occupations
Expand the opportunity for registered apprenticeships and other on-the-job training opportunities
Support the creation, expansion, and enhancement of climate-critical training programs
Create opportunities for workers and businesses to transition into the industry
Support women and minority businesses

MassCEC’s Clean Energy Internship Program

Massachusetts clean energy businesses, many of which are small, need help accessing robust talent pipelines to remain competitive with more established industries with stronger career awareness. To address this challenge, MassCEC developed the Clean Energy Internship program to expand paid career exploration and on-the-job training opportunities among students while also providing clean energy employers with an active marketplace to discover talent and subsidize internships.
“MassCEC’s Clean Energy Internship Program has a generational impact on clean energy careers and enables talented students to stay in Massachusetts.”
— Matthew Nordan, Managing Director at Azolla Ventures

Program Results

5,800+ Internships Supported
620+ Unique Employers
65% of Participants are Women and Minorities
$26.5M+ Awarded and $6.8M+ Leveraged

Broader Impacts

1,030+ Interns Hired Permanently
Resource for employers to access and hire diverse candidates
Access to diversity, equity, and inclusion training

Collaborating to Expand Clean Energy Career Awareness

Expanding clean energy career awareness is crucial to growing and diversifying the pipeline for tomorrow’s clean energy workforce. To help address this challenge, MassCEC partnered with the Massachusetts Executive Office of Education, the Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs, and the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education to create a new Clean Energy Innovation Pathway to provide high school students with applied, hands-on learning opportunities in the clean energy sector. Participating students will have access to interactive curricular resources, opportunities for career pathway mapping, and experiential learning in the field.

Broader Impacts

For the launch year, six high schools across the Commonwealth will plan new Clean Energy Innovation Pathways to increase awareness of clean energy careers, support the next generation of climate leaders, and join the nearly 200 high schools across the Commonwealth using Innovation Career Pathways to introduce students to in-demand careers.
CLEAN ENERGY TALENT

CLEAN ENERGY WORKER DEMOGRAPHICS20

The representation of workers by demographic group as a percentage of the clean energy workforce remained roughly unchanged from the 2022 to 2023 reports. There was a 7% increase in female workers compared to a 3% increase in male workers in absolute numbers over the same time period. Additionally, there was an 8% increase in the number of workers over the age of 55. While there was a slight increase in the number of jobs in a majority of the other demographic groups, the number of American Indian or Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islanders decreased from the 2022 to 2023 reports. 

The state is committed to supporting individuals in environmental justice neighborhoods and disadvantaged populations to get the education and training needed to access high-paying occupations in clean energy and enabling minority and women-owned business enterprises to access the resources needed to pivot and grow as employers in the clean energy industry.
20 Data for age, race, ethnicity, and gender: https://www.bls.gov/lau/table14full22.htm. Population percentages for American Indian or Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islanders, or Two or more races were used due to lack of BLS data: www.jobseq.com. Veterans’ employment: https://www.bls.gov/news.release/vet.t06a.htm & BLS QCEW 2022 Annual Employment for Massachusetts.
2023 Clean Energy Employment
Percent of 2023 Clean Energy Workforce
Percent of 2023 Overall MA Workforce
Male
74,402
68.6%
51.4%
Female
34,048
31.4%
48.6%
Hispanic or Latino/a/x
17,130
15.8%
12.3%
Not Hispanic or Latino/a/x
91,320
84.2%
87.7%
White
80,322
74.1%
79.4%
Black or African American
8,660
8.0%
8.6%
Asian
9,056
8.4%
7.3%
American Indian or Alaska Native
1,174
1.1%
0.2%
Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islanders
817
0.8%
0.0%
Two or more races
8,422
7.8%
4.4%
Veterans
9,956
9.2%
3.4%
Workers over the age of 55
15,981
14.7%
26.0%
2023 Clean Energy Employment
Female
74,402
Male
34,048
Hispanic or Latino/a/x
17,130
Not Hispanic or Latino/a/x
91,320
White
80,322
Black or African American
8,660
Asian
9,056
American Indian or Alaska Native
1,174
Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander
817
Two or more races
8,422
Veterans
9,956
Workers over the age of 55
15,981
Percent of 2023 Clean Energy Workforce
Female
68.6%
Male
31.4%
Hispanic or Latino/a/x
15.8%
Not Hispanic or Latino/a/x
84.2%
White
74.1%
Black or African American
8.0%
Asian
8.4%